Grilled sea bass with creamy mashed potato and watercress pesto

I had this in a restaurant and was determined to recreate it; they did it with wilted spinach but you can use any delicate green vegetables that are in season, I used samphire.

Prep: 15 mins
Cook: 30 mins
Servings: 2

Ingredients

  • 3 large potatoes, peeled and quartered
  • 100g butter
  • large splash of whole milk
  • sea salt
  • 2 sea bass fillets, skin on
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • any green vegetables, lightly cooked
  • 4 teaspoons of watercress pesto

Instructions

Make the mashed potato by boiling the potatoes until you can stick a knife through them easily, drain well then mash until creamy, with butter, milk and salt. 

Meanwhile heat some olive oil in a large shallow frying pan and sear the sea bass on its skin side. No need to flip, just put a lid on for a couple of mins so the flesh steams through.

Serve with steamed or stir-fried seasonal green vegetables and the watercress pesto.

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Portion Guidelines

Instead of living with the bore of weighing food, counting points or calories and tapping everything you eat into a phone you can use nature’s custom-designed tool – your hands!

Nutrition Info

Potatoes

Potatoes are wrongly slated by nutrition fashionistas. They have plenty going for them, as well as being incredibly delicious!

Their biggest claim to fame is their vitamin B6, which is used throughout the body for cell formation, and that’s a pretty big task. B6 is also a key player in nerve and brain function, as well as gene expression. Spuds are also pretty rich in vitamin C, which isn’t only good for immunity but plays a strong part in forming and maintaining healthy connective tissue and skin.

Spying a heavy growth of watercress on the bank of a wet meadow, Amelia went to examine it. Grasping a bunch, she pulled until the delicate stems snapped. “Watercress is plentiful here, isn’t it? I’ve heard it can be made into a fine salad or sauce.” “It’s also a medicinal herb. The Rom call it panishok. it’s a powerful love tonic. For women, especially.” “A what?” The delicate greenery fell from her nerveless fingers. “If a man wishes to reawaken his lover’s interest, he feeds her watercress. It’s a stimulant of the—” “Don’t tell me! Don’t!” Rohan laughed, a mocking gleam in his eyes.

Lisa Kleypas, Mine til Midnight
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