Crab spaghettini with chilli and garlic

Evocative of beautiful relaxed holiday evenings sitting outside in the warm air. I always use white crabmeat that I buy from my fish man, it’s lighter and has more bite.

Spaghettini works well because it’s nice and fine, it means the crab doesn’t get lost amongst the fronds!

Prep: 5 mins
Cook: 20 mins
Servings: 2

Ingredients

  • 60-100g of spaghettini or spaghetti per person (depending on person size and hunger!)
  • olive oil
  • 1 large white onion, finely chopped*
  • 1 fat clove of garlic, very finely chopped*
  • 1 large red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped*
  • 150g of white crabmeat* – can use tinned
  • handful of chopped fresh parsley*
  • 1 juicy fresh lemon
  • coarse ground black pepper
  • sea salt
  • *can use frozen

Instructions

Put a large pan of salted water on to boil and start cooking the spaghettini. It’ll need about 9-10 mins from boiling.

Mean time, in a large heavy frying pan, gently fry the onion, garlic and chilli in olive oil until the onion is translucent. Add the crab meat and some sea salt and black pepper. Cook it for 5-16 minutes.

When the pasta is cooked but still al dente drain it (but always leave a little bit of the starchy water in with the pasta to keep it from clumping).

Tp the pasta in with the crab mix and combine it using two forks.

Serve with a scattering of chopped fresh parsley, a squeeze of lemon, extra black pepper and a cloud of rated Parmesan.

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Portion Guidelines

Instead of living with the bore of weighing food, counting points or calories and tapping everything you eat into a phone you can use nature’s custom-designed tool – your hands!

Nutrition Info

Crab

Crab is a good source of omega-3 fatty acids to help balance intake of omega-3 and omega-6, which helps prevent inflammation as well as assisting with cognitive function.

Crab, and most shellfish, contains plenty of zinc which is fab for immunity, skin health and sense of taste; copper for thyroid function, bone and tissue health and energy production; Selenium, also for thyroid function (never neglect your thyroid, it drives virtually EVERYTHING!); and vitamin B12 for cardiovascular support, DNA production, energy production and brain and nervous system health.

Zinc absorption can be inhibited by fibre so in a high fibre diet it’s especially prudent to optimise intake.

I once had a patient who was convinced that his head was full of sea water and a crab lived inside. When I asked him what happened to his brain he told me that aliens had sucked it out with a drinking straw. “It is better this way,” he insisted. “Now there’s more room for the crab.”

Michael Robotham
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